Remembering World War One

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Anderson, Albert E., 1894-1988
Albert E. "Gillie" Anderson was born March 29, 1894 in Cromwell, CT. He resided there until his death in 1988. He enlisted in the Navy during the war and attained the rank of Seaman. He served as a gun captain on the ship. He was posted with the Navy in the Atlantic, near France and Wales. He volunteered to bring munitions to Wales. While in Wales, he was informed by a shipmate that his ship had been sunk. He was honorably discharged at the end of the war. He served aboard the USS New Hampshire, USS Carola, Naval Base Cardiff, Wales, and the USS Kermoor.
Arbuckle, Lawrence Lee, 1894-1955
Private Lawrence Lee Arbuckle was born in Indianapolis, Indiana about 1894. He was a soldier in F Company, 7th Engineer Regiment, Fifth Infantry Division, American Expeditionary Forces from 1918-1919., Connecticut State Library
Associated Items
This collection features items that have no associated soldier, nurse or other World War One related entity. These digital items were donated by various people at events across Connecticut., RG 012:011, Connecticut State Library, 1850-2016, Department of War Records, Remembering World War One, State Archives, Connecticut State Library
Auerhamer, Joseph H., 1896-1980
Joseph Auerhamer was the company clerk for the 302nd Company F. from New Haven, Connecticut. Served in France at Toul Sector November 4-11, 1918; Toul Sector, Marcheville Off. November 9, 1918 Toul Sector Pintheville, Butgneville Boes de Harville Off. November 10-11 1918. Returned to U.S. from foreign service May 3, 1919. As the clerk he had to enter information into other soldiers' books, but someone else had to fill his book out.
Bagnall, James Joseph, 1893-1977
James Joseph Bagnall lived in Brighton, Massachusetts and worked at Hood Rubber Company in Watertown. He had been at Hood since June 1910 as a Tire Builder and had been night foreman for the last two years. He was 24 when he enlisted in the Army in Oct. or November 1917. Jim’s birth and baptism certificates call him James E. Bagnall. There is a family story that his middle name was Ernest and because he thought it sounded German he changed his middle name to Joseph. He trained at the Army base at Kelly Field, near El Paso, Texas. The 805th Aero Squadron was organized on Nov. 23, 1917, and left Kelly Field on Dec. 30th 1917. In early November 1918, Jim applied for a commission in the Army and received recommendations from Major A.L. Ellwood, 1st Lieut. C.E Lloyd, 2nd Lieut. John A. Elwell and 2nd Lieut. Robert E. Hine. His promotion is declared on a certificate dated May 21st, 1919, signed by F.J. Rosemeier, 1st Lieut., in Romorantin, France. Jim was promoted to “MFAS, 805 Aero Squadron of the Regular Army”. Jim sailed back to the U.S on the Leviathan in June 1919. The diary entries for June –July appear to be written in another hand, possibly by Anna Isabel Rigney in 1919 and concern Jim’s return to the U.S. on June 12th, his discharge about June 20th and their activities and entertainments that summer. He and Anna were married on Sept. 14, 1919 in South Boston, Mass. Jim returned to work for Hood Rubber for the rest of his career., RG 012:011, Connecticut State Library, 1850-2016, Department of War Records, Remembering World War One
Bi
A panoramic photo of a possible motor pool repair base
Bobalki, Andrew 1895-1970
Andrew was the son of immigrants from Czechoslovakia. He was born in Bridgeport, CT, where he was a resident. He enlisted in the Navy in 1917 in the Pacific fleet. He served on the U.S.S. Mississippi battleship as a boiler tender. Upon discharge he returned home to Bridgeport as a petty officer. He worked at General Electric for over 30 years as a sheet metal mechanic. He played first base in the Rosebud baseball club. Andrew belonged to the American Legion in Bridgeport. He was a founding member of the Maigue yacht club. Andrew married Mary Gacki, who died in 1955; the two had no children. Andrew is buried in St. Michael's cemetery in Stratford, CT., RG 012:011, Connecticut State Library, 1850-2016, Department of War Records, Remembering World War One, State Archives, Connecticut State Library, Bobalki, David and Thomas (nephews)
Books, Charles, 1898-1940
He died of mustard gas poisoning which caused him to be unable to eat..he had married a woman name Ruth..he died before his niece, the donor, was born...
Bradley, Milton Peck, 1896-1987
Milton Peck Bradley lived in Branford and was a banker at The Morris Plan, a New Haven bank prior to WWI. Bradley enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve Force on May 11, 1917 in New Haven. He served aboard the USS Gem, a converted yacht used in anti-submarine weapons experiments. The experiments, run by the Submarine Defense Association, were overseen by Lindon Wallace Bates who chaired the Engineering Committee. Bradley's active duty ranged from July 16, 1917 to January 15, 1919 when he received an honorable discharge as a Quartermaster 2nd Class. Bradley had three children, a son Robert (a Marine in World War II) and two daughters. He spent a lot of time traveling and with his family. Milton Peck Bradley died at the age of 92.
Brine, Alfred, C 1897 - 1988
Canadian Army, was wounded in France was in the hospital for over year
Brown, Anna Irvina, 1891-1984
Anna Irvina (McDowell) Brown was a Groton, Connecticut native who enlisted in the US Naval Reserve Force on July 2, 1917. She was stationed in New London and was discharged as a Yeoman 1st Class on 15 July 1918. Anna married fellow US Naval Reserve Force sailor Everett Eugene Brown, a Gunner's Mate 2nd Class, on December 12, 1917., RG 012:011, Connecticut State Library, 1850-2016, Department of War Records, Remembering World War One, State Archives, Connecticut State Library
Brown, Everett Eugene, 1894-1961
Everett Eugene Brown was a Groton, Connecticut native who enlisted in the US Naval Reserve Force on July 9, 1917 while living in Derby where he worked as a carpenter at General Ordnance Company. He was a Gunner's Mate 2nd Class and received an Honorable Discharge on July 8, 1921. Everett married fellow US Naval Reserve Force Yeomanette Anna Irvina McDowell on December 12, 1917., RG 012:011, Connecticut State Library, 1850-2016, Department of War Records, Remembering World War One, State Archives, Connecticut State Library
Cardascio, Antonio, 1892-1988
Antonio Cardascio came from Italy through Ellis Island. He spoke Italian and was very proud to fight for America as part the U.S. Army in France, where he served. He was inducted into the Army on August 25, 1918 and received an Honorable Discharge with a Surgeons Certificate of Disability (25% disabled) on March 10, 1920. In a battle, Cardascio lost his footing and fell down a hill. He was lost for a few days in the woods before being discovered by the Allies. Antonio was honorably discharged and returned to West Haven where he worked at a belt factory near the railroad tracks. He married, built a three family home in West Haven where three of his children still reside but never returned to Italy. Antonio Cardascio had a lifelong limp from his fall on the battlefield., RG 012:011, Connecticut State Library, 1850-2016, Department of War Records, Remembering World War One, State Archives, Connecticut State Library
Carroll, William Augusta, 1894-19?
William Carroll was born in Boston in 1894. According to Eaward Schafer, Carroll, also known as "Shorty" was at one point in an orphan asylum in Boston. Schafer says that someone stole a nun's pen and Carroll was then "striped" outside. He then "ran away to Vermont and now knows only French." By 1917 Carroll was living in Bennington, Vermont. On June 18, 1917 he enlisted in Co. I, 1st Infantry, Vermont National Guard, where he served until August 18, 1917. He was then transferred to Co. C, 102nd Infantry Regiment, 26th Division where he was a cook. He was in France from September 17, 1817 to April 7, 1919. He received an honorable discharge at Camp Devens on April 29, 1919.
Ciliano (Scigliano), Serafino, 1890-1977
Serafino Ciliano (Scigliano) was in Acri, Calabria, Italy at the start of WWI, possibly working as a farmer. He was in the Italian calvary. It is unclear as to when Serafino came to the United States or exactly where he emigrated to, but it is likely that he emigrated to the U.S. to Norwich, CT or possibly Westerly, RI. He served in the United States Army as a Private for Co. F, 39th Infantry. Has a Lady of Columbia certificate, indicating that he was injured. He married Antoinette Vuono sometime after 1920. After the war he worked as a mason for construction company. Serafino died in Norwich, CT January 6, 1977. "My father worked hard at his manual labor job. He retired in his sixties and lived to 86. In retirement, he attended daily mass at St. Mary's Church in Norwich in walking distance from our family home, a duplex. My mother and he raised 6 children in the upstairs apartment and rented the lower apartment. Three of my brothers served in WWII, a fourth brother served in the Korean War. I was (am) the "baby" of the family." - story provided by daughter of Serafino., RG 012:011, Connecticut State Library, 1850-2016, Department of War Records, Remembering World War One
Clark, Earl R. 1898-1918
Earl R. Clark was a Middletown resident who enlisted in the Connecticut National Guard on June 23, 1916. Clark served with Co. C, 1st Connecticut Infantry and took part in the Mexican Punitive Expedition serving 4 months on the Mexican border. He continued his service and became part of Co. C, 102d Infantry Regiment, 26th "Yankee" Division. He arrived in France in September 1917 and was killed at the battle of Seicheprey on April 20, 1918., Connecticut State Library
Cone, Harold Jared 1893-1979
Letter written in the midst of WWI (1918) from the war front
Conn,Raymond, Arthur
Entered the war married, assisted the doctors during the war using a hemestat to assist doctors to perform surgeries.He kept this tool to pass down within his family to pull baby teeth out his kids and grandkids. Shoulder Brass and dog tags he wore on his uniform. Conn enlisted at the age of 29. Conn arrived in France the 6th of October 1918. Conn shared stories with his granddaughter about a sick boat ride home and an encounter with a monk. He explained that on the way back from France, the majority of the boat was sick with the Spanish flu. He was concerned of getting sick and the stormy choppy weather they'd face. Also he at a monastery camp he seen a monk inflicting pain on himself with a cat of nine tails. As he was called for prayer, Conn stole the cat of nine tails. Later on a group of monks searched all the rooms for the cat of nine tails and they did not find it.
Conroy, John Francis, 1895-1959
John Francis Conroy (1895-1959) was a resident of Hartford, and was employed at Colt Firearms as a machinist. He enlisted in the US army in April, 1918, and was assigned to the 113th infantry regiment of the 29th Division as a machine-gunner. John was severely wounded in a gas barrage on Sept 20th, 1918 during the Meuse­ Argonne offensive that ended the war. His older brother Michael would be killed the same week at Cambrai. John suffered the effects of the wound the rest of his life, according to family members. [Information provided by Peter Hickey, grand-nephew of John Conroy.]
Conroy, Martin James, 1893-1967
Martin James Conroy was a resident of Hartford, and was employed at the Pope factory as a tire makes, but like Michael enlisted in the Canadian Army in May 1918, and served in France. His unit and service record have not yet been documented.
Conroy, Michael, 1890-1918
Michael Conroy (1890-1918) emigrated [from County Mayo, Ireland] about 1910. He lived in Hartford and was employed at Colt Firearms as a machinist, but then enlisted in the Canadian Army in April of 1917, about two weeks after the entry of the United States into the war. Serving as a Lance Corporal in the 58th Battalion of Canadian Infantry, he was killed in action on Sept. 29, 1918 during the Cambrai offensive, six weeks before the armistice. He was awarded Canada's Distinguished Service Cross, and is buried in the British Army's Anneux Cemetery in Cambrai, France. He was also recognized by the City of Hartford as one of its war dead with a bronze plaque that for many years was among those lining the streets through Hartford's Colt Park. These plaques were just recently re-discovered in a city office building basemen and are being restored. [Information supplied by Peter Conroy Hickey, grand-nephew of Michael Conroy.]
Consic, Walter Charles 1900-1960
Walter Consic grew up in Moodus, CT. Enisted on April 19, 1918 in New Haven. Served as a motorcycle mechanic at Base hospital 69, 88 and 113. Two of the hospitals were in the town of Savanay, France. He was married in 1923 while living in New Britain. He was working as a machinist. Worked as a cook in New York City in 1935. Wife passed away in 1925 and was remarried to Anna Stein in 1941. His son by his first wife was in the Navy WW2.
Crandall, Willard, -1918
Crandall was honorably discharged in Dec. 1918. Was living in New Britain, Conn. when he joined war. Was oart of US Army., Died in New Britain, and buried in Fairview Cemetary.
Cushman, Leroy E., 1891-1975
Leroy Cushman was born in Poultney, Vermont on November 27, 1891 to Allerton Earl Cushman and Nellie Grace Cushman (née Honey). He was married to Grace Genevive Gregory. He was a jeweler by occupation and was inducted into the Army on July 24, 1918 in Fair Haven, Vermont. He was discharged from the draft on July 29, 1918 by reason of physical disability. Yet he was inducted again on August 30, 1918 into the 152d Depot Brigade. On September 28, 1918 he transferred to the Medical Department at Camp Upton in Yaphank, New York where he served until his discharge on March 21, 1919. After the war Leroy Cushman was an active member of the American Legion, the Elks and the Knights of Columbus.
Daniels, Fremont, 1894-1949
Fremont Daniels enlisted in the Connecticut National Guard on February 13, 1914 at 19 years old. He served in various companies in the Coast Artillery Corps until June 1918 when he was transferred to Battery D of the newly formed 68th Artillery, Coast Artillery Corps (CAC). Daniels went to France in August 1918 and served with the American Expeditionary Forces until February 16, 1919. He received and honorable discharge on Febraury 28, 1919 and returned to New London., Connecticut State Library
D'Ausilio, Giovanibattista, 1877-1958
Giovanibattista D'Ausilio was born in Ariano Irpino, Italy on March 16, 1878. He enlisted in the Italian Army on August 5, 1898 but was released because he was too weak. He was called to serve again in 1899 and served until April 12, 1902. Soon after his discharge he came to America landing in New York in 1902 and settling in Bridgeport, Connecticut, where he applied for citizenship in 1908. Giovanibattista was called to join the Army again in May 1915 and returned home to Italy, where he was assigned to the 242d Battalion of the Territorial Militia. By April 1916 he had been promoted to Sergeant and fought with the 8th Bersaglieri Regiment. In May 1916 he was promoted to 1st Sergeant Machine Gunner and left for Albania fighting with the 225th Battalion Territorial Militia. He was wounded in November 1916 and was put on leave 90 days while recovering in the hospital at Bari. He returned to service with a platoon in the Benevento Territorial Militia and was discharged in Decemeber 1918. Giovanibattista received a Commemorative Medal for the Italo-Austrian War 1915–1918 and the Allied Victory Medal. He returned to America where he died in 1958., Connecticut State Library
Delorme, Romeo J., 1895-1959
The donor is the granddaughter of the service member; this is her paternal grandfather. He was from Berlin, NH and was living in Pawtucket, RI when he enlisted as a private first class in the Army. He was a machinist prior to the war. She has his enlistment and discharge papers. He was part of the AEF from November 26, 1917 to June 19, 1919.
Dillon, John T, 1895-1977
John T. Dillon was born in Ennis, County Clare, Ireland on December 17, 1895. He arrived in New York in August 1896 with his mother and older brother to join his father. The Dillon family moved to the Fair Haven section of New Haven where John was raised. Dillon enlisted in the Connecticut National Guard on June 23, 1917 attached to Co. C, 102nd Infantry Regiment, a company known as the Sarsfield Guard. He arrived in France on October 17, 1917 where he served in the trenches at Chemin des Dames and Toul sectors before being on the front lines at the Battle of Seicheprey. Dillon was gassed on June 8, 1918 and suffered a permanent loss of smell. Dillon was promoted to Sergeant and moved to Château-Thierry on July 5, 1918. On July 18 he was informed he would be "going over the top" and might not return. Four days later he was wounded by shrapnel in fighting near Vaux and Epieds and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism. He was treated for his wounds and returned to the trenches until the Armistice ended the war. Dillon received numerous citations from the 26th Division as well as a Purple Heart for his actions at Château-Thierry. He received an Honorable Discharge on April 5, 1919. While still in France awaiting discharge and transport back to the U.S. he was told by a senior officer "You know you did not have to be here - you are not a U.S. citizen." Dillon rectified that by becoming a naturalized citizen on September 3, 1919. Dillon went home and worked at the family business, New Haven Burial Case until 1930 when he started his own business, Dillon Brothers Casket Company. He married Marie Reilly in 1930 and had three children and four grandchildren. He was a member of the Legion of Valor, Yankee Division Veterans Association, Last Man's Club and Maples Athletic Club. He died January 7, 1977 at the age of 82., Connecticut State Library
Drescher, Lawrence 1891-1993.
German descent. Father was German. He enlisted, family was unhappy because they were German. Lived to be 102. Pictures in enlistment uniform. Donator lives in house which has been in family since 1915. Great uncle by marriage. Married grandmother's sister. Donator used to take him out to dinner for his birthday. Grew up in Baltic, CT. His wife acted like donator's grandmother. Veteran never had any children. Veteran had 3 sisters, none ever married. His father was a butcher, he was a butcher. In the meat trade in Baltic. They (the family) ran a garage in Baltic. Drescher's Garage. After the war, he returned to being a butcher and running the family meat market. Ended up running the universal store in Baltic. Meat company got bought out by "Swift." He was an early investor in the stalk market; what he did for a living as early as the 50s. Donator remembers going to house to watch television and would see "ticker tape" on bottom. Very frugal, never had kids. Amateur photographer. Ended up taking many pictures. May have been Methodist. Active in the Masons. Masons did article on him when he turned 100. Was a 33rd degree mason. Never sent overseas because he was German. Went to basic training, and that was it. There is a scrolled picture of his unit at a basic training place. 41st Tr. Battery, FACOTS. Photograph taken at Fort Zachary Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. In photograph, he is 32nd from the right. Amateur radio hobbies. For broadcast radio. Parents: George and Anna, owned a house in Groton Longpoint. Was about 18 when he enlisted in the military. Branch of military is unknown.
Edman, Paul M., 1894-1964
Paul M. Edman was born in 1894 in Bristol, Connecticut the son of John and Alma Edman. On September 20, 1917 Paul was drafted to serve in the U.S. Army. He served with Co. D, 303 Machine Gun Battalion, 76th Division, until November 9, 1918. He then served with Co. D, 148th Machine Gun Battalion, 41st Division until February 1, 1919 when he transferred to Co. I, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division. He served in France and the Koblenz area of received an Honorable Discharge on September 26, 1919. Paul's younger brother Roy F. Edman enlisted in the Connecticut National Guard and was seriously wounded at Château-Thierry and died of his wounds several days later., Connecticut State Library

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